Fun picture books for beginning readers, plus learning activities

Are you looking for funny stories for your beginning reader? Silly stories using easy-to-read CVC and sight words?  With silly pictures to make kids laugh? And learning activities to reinforce the phonics?

We’ve made them!

Click on the image above for more information on these beginning readers.

Years ago, when my kids were learning to read, that’s what I wanted. But I couldn’t find them. So I started writing them. My sister, an art teacher, made them even funnier with her cartoon-like drawings. We tried them out on our kids and later my students, improved them, and now they are available for you to use with your beginning readers.

The story themes focus on little kids’ lives.

• A six-year-old receives a yo-yo for her birthday, but her father wants to play with it.

• A baby brother wants to do what his kindergarten-age brother does, but he’s too little.

• A wild child makes a mess while the babysitter gabs on the phone.

• A preschooler talks his grandfather into playing with his toys.

• A five-year-old devises ways to hide her father’s bald head.

After each story are several pages of game-like learning activities to reinforce the words and ideas of the stories.

My sister, Anne Trombetta, the illustrator, and I, the author, are teachers with masters’ degrees. We’ve applied educational research to devise story lines, words, activities and art to engage new readers.

Please check out our early reader picture books. We hope you’ll not only buy  them, but tell us how your little reader responded to the silly stories.

Is the “summer slide” a myth?

New research published in Education Next  says that previous research indicating a loss of learning during summer months may not be true.

Summer slide (decline) of reading scores.

Researcher Paul T. von Hippel, of the University of Texas at Austin, says he now doubts if students lose months of skills each summer or if a ninth grade achievement gap can be based on the cumulative effect of not studying during the summer while students are in elementary school.

The original research showing a “summer slide” was done on students in Baltimore in the 1980s.  But von Hippel says the testing methods used then tended to distort student reading scores.  He and his colleagues tried to replicate part of the 1980 study and could not, leading him to question the conclusion of that study.

He said that soon after the study was reported, faults were found in it, but they somehow became forgotten over time.

Von Hippel said that a researcher could achieve any gap desired by asking certain questions.

Does this mean that over the summer students remember all that they learned during the past year?  Not necessarily.  But better research, the kind which can be replicated, must be done to say if the summer slide is real and to what extent learning is lost or retained.

Try this word game in the car or plane

Summer means travel, and that can mean bored children.  Word games cannot only keep kids engaged, but can strengthen educational skills.  Here a game made up and shared by a clever teacher (Thank you, Carol) to use with her five-year-old son.   “The Sight Word Game” requires only a willing adult and child.

Adult:  I am thinking of a word with two letters.

Child:  Is one letter “a”?

Adult:  No.

Child:  Is one letter “d”?

Adult:  Yes.

Child:  Is the other letter “t”?

Adult:  No.  Remember how every word must have a vowel?  “D” is not a vowel, so the other letter must be a vowel.  And I already said “a” is not a letter in this word.  That leaves “e,” “i,” “o,” and “u.”  And sometimes “y” but not this time.

Child:  Is it an “o”?

Adult:  Yes!  What is the word?

Child:  Do.  Do.  Now it’s my turn to think of a word.

What is FANBOYS?

FANBOYS is an acronym for the seven words recognized in English as coordinating conjunctions.  Those words are

  • For
  • And
  • Nor
  • But
  • Or
  • Yet
  • So.

Using these words is an acceptable way to join two or more nouns, verbs, and many other grammatical constructions, including independent clauses.  When independent clauses are joined they form a compound sentence.

The FANBOYS acronym is an easy way for children to remember which words can be used to form compound sentences.  If one of these coordinating conjunctions is used, then a comma must be used after the first clause unless the clause has only a few words.

Some people use “then” as if it were a coordinating conjunction, but it isn’t.  “Then” is an adverb and cannot join two clauses unless a coordinating conjunction is also used.

Another way to form a compound sentence is to use a semicolon.  When a semicolon is used, no coordinating conjunction is used.  Clauses joined by a semicolon must be related in content.

Other conjunctions, called subordinate conjunctions, are used to join one independent clause and one or more dependent / subordinate clauses.  Complex sentences join two clauses of unequal weight while compound sentences usually join two clauses of equal weight.

Beginning readers needn’t know about coordinating conjunctions.  By third grade students are learning rules of grammar.  That is when they usually encounter FANBOYS for the first time.

Beginning writers sometimes think that if they use a coordinating conjunction to join two little sentences, they are writing better.  Sometimes they are.  But sometimes they are just creating stringy sentences.

 

How to foster rich academic language

Academic language—the vocabulary and phrases we use to talk about what we are studying, such as “factor,” “amendment,” or “gerund”—begins early in a student’s life.  “Add” and “subtract” are academic words.  So are “vowel,” “consonant,” and “syllable.”

Today it seems there are more academic language words than when I was a student.  “Digraph” was a word I didn’t learn until I was an adult.  I didn’t need it.  As a student, I learned “blend” which meant both blends and digraphs.  I learned “evaporate” in high school when I studied the water cycle for the first time.  But my four-year-old grandson was taught evaporation in his preschool.  He explained: “The rain comes down and then it goes back up again.”

What can we do to help our youngest students become comfortable with academic language?  According to researchers Friedberg, Mitchell, and Brooke* we can do plenty.

We can foster a language rich environment, whether at home or in the classroom.  We can use precise, adult words which are just as easy to learn as “baby” words.  “Explain what you see.”  “What can you infer about the feelings of Cinderella?”

We can teach essential vocabulary, and repeat those words often so that students learn them.  “Before,” “during,” “next” and “after” are essential to describe sequences.  Synonyms and antonyms need to be taught.  “Sufficient” means “enough.”

We can teach words showing shades of meaning.    An “incident” is a small “event.”  A “catastrophe” is a big “problem.”

We can teach content area words.  In a math class, we can teach “addend” and “sum.”  In a reading class, we can teach “sentence” “fragment” and “run-on.”

We can model the use of academic language.  We can say “spider” and “insect,” not “bug.”

To reinforce meanings, we can show photos, draw pictures and use diagrams.  We can post graphics on the refrigerator or bulletin board for students to scrutinize up close.

As students become a bit older, we can teach root words, prefixes and suffixes to show word relationships.  “Un” means “not” so “unhealthy” means not healthy.  “Ful” at the end of a word turns a noun into an adjective, so “grace” becomes “graceful.”

We can model self-monitoring of comprehension.  We can read a sentence or a paragraph and then paraphrase aloud what we just read to prove we understand it.

*“​Understanding Academic Language and its Connection to School Success​” (Friedberg, Mitchell, & Brooke, 2016).

 

 

 

Do dyslexia-friendly fonts help people to read?

The answer is no, according to Guinevere Eden*, Ph. D., director of the Center for the Study of Learning at Georgetown University Medical Center.

According to Dr. Eden, scientific studies on these kinds of fonts in 2016, 2017 and 2018 show these fonts to have “no measurable benefits” in helping people to read.

What are “dyslexia-friendly” fonts?

  • These fonts use thicker lines or curves in some parts of letters, especially the parts which sit on the line.
  • These fonts slant letters slightly.
  • These fonts vary the length of letters with ascenders (b, d an h, for example) and letters with descenders (letters like g, j and p, for example.
  • These fonts leave extra space between letters.

To see an example of this type font, search for Dyslexie or Open Dyslexic.

*As quoted in Understood, available online at https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/dyslexia/dyslexia-friendly-font

Three reasons why singing helps kids learn to read

Why is some music more intrinsically interesting than other music?

A researcher did an experiment with a piece of modern music which did not repeat phrases.  The researcher “rewrote” the piece to repeat sections.  Nothing new was added, but certain parts were repeated, like the “Ee-I-ee-I-oh” in “Old MacDonald had a farm.

Then the unfamiliar piece was listened to, both in its original form and in its rewritten form.  The “jury” liked the rewritten part better.

Why?  Our brains love patterns, whether the patterns are parts of a musical piece or rhyming sounds at the ends of verses or the red and white stripes on a flag.

For children too young to read and for beginning readers, singing songs with patterns is an educational skill which can prepare them for later reading.

Why?

Suppose they are singing “Row, Row, Row Your Boat.”  The first three words repeat, as do the words “Merrily, merrily, merrily.”  The repetition makes the words and the song easier to remember.  Remembering is an important reading skill—remembering sight words, remembering letter sounds, remembering word meanings, remembering the meaning of the beginning of a sentence when you get to the end.

In the same song, “stream” and “dream” rhyme at the ends of the second and fourth lines.  Rhymes like this are the earliest form of figurative language that children encounter.  Even little children can appreciate the cleverness of expressing ideas in rhyme, though they like rhymes mostly because rhymes make songs fun.

Patterns in songs help children recognize that songs have a sequence of expression.  We don’t sing “Merrily, merrily, merrily” before we sing “Row, row, row.”  There is a rightness and a wrongness of putting a song together.  Certain ideas come first and other ideas come later.  The same is true of stories.  A beginning comes before an ending.

Singing with your child is fun, but it is more than that.  It’s building a foundation for the child’s thinking and reading future.