What does CVC mean?

CVC means consonant-vowel-consonant.   It refers to one syllable, short vowel words beginning with a consonant, followed by a short vowel and ending with a consonant. “Cat,” “pen,” “pig,” “dot,” and “bug” are examples of CVC words.

CVC means consonant-vowel-consonant, and refers to one syllable, short vowel words beginning with a consonant.

In CVC words, all the letters are pronounced, and they are pronounced the way children expect.  So for example, the word “gas” is a CVC word, but the word “was” is not since the “a” sounds like a “u” and the “s” sounds like a “z.”

Most children learning to read understand a one-to-one logic system.  CVC words follow that logic system.  Each time a student reads a “d,” it sounds like a “d.”  Each time a student reads a short “a,” it sounds like a short “a.”  No silent letters as in “bike” or “boat.”  No digraphs as in “chat” and “them.”  No letter combinations that change sound in different words like “sew” and “few.”

What's your thinking on this topic?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s